Tag Archives: The Longest Shortest Time

podcasts of the last few weeks. (and months. and years.) Ep. 11

NaBloPoMo November 2015

Something has gone a little quirky with my PocketCasts app; for whatever reason, a lot of old episodes recently downloaded onto my phone when my phone’s WiFi was left on. (This snafu nearly blew our monthly home Internet/data/Wifi/whatever usage allowance slightly over the edge.) And when I say a lot, I’m talking 1,300 back episodes — some of which are over three years old and some that I know I’ve listened to and deleted.

(I’m a little frustrated with PocketCasts, actually; it seems a bit unreliable lately, quirky, and more than a little buggy.  Anyone else having these sort of issues or is it just me?)  I’m sure there’s some explanation that more technical minds than mine could figure out.

While I’m pondering that, here’s something else I can’t figure out: why the hell was The Longest Shortest Time cancelled by WNYC?

I listen to a bunch of podcasts — as of this writing, I subscribe to 88 of ’em, which could be contributing to my downloading issues, but I can’t be the only person who subscribes to this many podcasts, can I?  — and The Longest Shortest Time is one of my top five. Hillary Frank has a knack for telling compelling stories about the struggles of parenthood. It’s honest, real, well-written and never fails to draw me in, regardless of the interview.

From the Facebook page, it seems as if Hillary Frank is considering next steps, which will hopefully involve taking LST to another home.  We can all keep our fingers crossed that this does happen — and sooner rather than later.  In the meantime, I’ll be catching up on a few LST episodes I’ve missed.

Here’s what I’ve been listening to lately — in chronological order, including the first episode of an infamous podcast that’s a year old:

Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Pastor Nadia Bolz-Weber On ‘Finding God In All The Wrong People (9/17/2015)
A recovering alcoholic and former stand-up comic, Nadia Bolz-Weber started The House For All Sinners and Saints, a church in Denver, Colorado that is rooted in the Lutheran tradition. (Bolz-Weber is an ordained minister in the ELCA).  She’s a down-to-earth combination of realism and traditional theology and I loved listening to her. Her new book, Accidental Saints: Finding God in the Wrong People, came out this month and I immediately checked it out from the library after listening to this interview.

Strangers: The Teacher Who Couldn’t Read (7/10/2015)
How does someone graduate from high school and college — and then spend 17 years as a high school teacher — without knowing how to read? John Corcoran did. His story is fascinating and sad at the same time.

New Yorker: Fiction: Michael Cunningham Reads Harold Brodkey’s “Dumbness Is Everything,” (6/1/2015)
I love Michael Cunningham and would happily listen to him reciting the alphabet. Even better is listening to his melodious voice read this Harold Brodkey story from a 1996 issue of The New Yorker. I’d never read — nor heard of — the late Harold Brodkey before this episode, which was certainly quite the way to start my morning commute to work.  (And yes, I now need to read much more of his stuff.) Love the New Yorker: Fiction podcasts for that very reason.

Death, Sex, and Money: “In Sickness and In Mental Health (4/8/2015)
One in five people has a mental illness. We have a stereotype about who “these people” are, but the reality is that people with mental illness are our family members, our friends and loved ones, and our co-workers.  They’re people like Guilia who was a happily married newlywed before experiencing a psychological break and being hospitalized for what would be diagnosed as bipolar disorder.

Serial: Episode 1, “The Alibi”  (10/3/2014)
In what is probably the cruelest part of having some episodes downloaded and others not, the first episode of “Serial” turned up in my queue, followed by … none of the others.  Of course I listened to the first episode anyway. Of course I did. And of course I’m now hooked.

As I said, it’s so odd that all these old episodes would suddenly just download. I can’t figure it out, but regardless of the reason, I’m glad it allowed me to catch some great episodes of some of my favorite podcasts.

 

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Podcasts of the (Last Few) Weeks: Ep. 9 and 10

 

I’m behind on my Podcast of the Week posts by a few weeks, which means that you get more than the usual amount of great stuff for your listening pleasure. So much good stuff to tell you about in this “episode.” Let’s get started.

One of my recent recommendations was “The Accidental Gay Parents” from The Longest Shortest Time. I loved this story about John and Trystan’s journey as a couple and their four-year quest to officially adopt John’s niece and nephew. Their adoption was finalized earlier this month and they recently returned to The Longest Shortest Time with an update in Episode 62, “The Accidental Gay Parents 2.” IfI had to make a list of some of my most favorite stories I’ve heard via podcast, this one would be among them. (A bonus: I found out that a local blogger friend of mine has been friends with Trystan since middle school!)

“Strangers” is becoming one of my must-listen-to podcasts and the first episode I heard was  “American Mormon – International Mr. Leather.”  I am totally drawing a blank on the guy’s name, but suffice it to say, he was raised Mormon. On the podcast, he shared his family’s reaction to his news that he was gay and and the losses of several friends and partners during the AIDS epidemic. Today, as the holder of the title “International Mr. Leather,” he speaks about his life in a polyamory relationship and the parallels it has with Mormonism.

Wearing a ribbon on one’s lapel to symbolize support for a particular cause is a gesture that needs no explanation. The idea of such a ribbon originated in spring 1991 when an artists’ group in New York known as Visual Aids decided to make a simple, folded red ribbon to raise awareness of AIDS. This was during a time when AIDS was feared and people with AIDS were pariahs. With “Awareness,” episode 173 of the podcast 99% Invisible, those who were involved in creating the first AIDS ribbons reflect on the impact of their small ribbon. (7/21/2015)

On Song Exploder, Death Cab for Cutie lead singer Ben Gibbard talks about the creation of “El Dorado” from the band’s new album and the origin of the song in his divorce from actress Zooey Deschanel. I include this because I really like Death Cab for Cutie.

Margaret Sullivan doesn’t do many interviews, but in the July 22 episode of Longform, she discussed her role as public editor of The New York Times. It’s a candid, insightful look at an interesting job as well as at journalism itself.

Longform gave its listeners a bonus episode on July 31 with this interview with Noreen Malone, the author of the New York Magazine piece “Cosby: The Women – An Unwanted Sisterhood.”  She discusses that powerful cover photo, the genesis for it, and the process of getting all the women to participate.

I’ll admit that I didn’t really follow all the news about the recent New Horizons’ mission to Pluto. The New Yorker Out Loud podcast’s July 20th episode “Do You Know Pluto?” was an intriguing look at this former planet – and what qualifies something to be categorized as a planet in the first place.

If you’re a ProBlogger reader, you might enjoy Darren Rowse’s new podcast, also called ProBlogger. His popular series, “31 Days to a Better Blog” is a must for newbies to this crazy blogging world and a reminder to those of us who have been doing this for awhile. (When anyone asks me if you can really make money from blogging, I’m going to direct them to Episode #32, “Can You Really Make Money Blogging?“)

I’m dying to talk to someone about Alec  Baldwin’s interview with singer-songwriter Paul Simon on “Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin” because it was … just … so… strange. I mean, it was almost uncomfortable to listen to. If you’ve heard it, you know what I mean and how Paul Simon (who I really like, but a little less so after that interview) came across as a total ass.

(A much more enjoyable “Here’s the Thing” episode was Alec’s conversation with David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker. Listen to that instead.)

…’til next time.

 

 

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