Tag Archives: Library Loot

Library Loot: August 10-16 (First Impressions, Perhaps a Record for Getting a New Library Card, and This Week’s Loot)

48 hours.

That’s how long it took us to get a library card after we moved here last week.

I drove back east to pick up the kids last Wednesday, stayed overnight at my mom’s, and we were back here in the ‘Burgh on Thursday.  By Saturday morning, Betty and I were at the circulation desk of our new library, signing up for cards.

Not only that, we’ve visited that particular branch as well as another one.  (That was on Monday.)

So far, my first impressions of the new libraries are good ones – despite the culture shock of the amount of books we’re permitted to have checked out per card.  We’re limited to a mere 25 books per card. Now, for some of you, I know that’s a perfectly acceptable and reasonable amount – and I agree.  But … but … you have to understand that we’re coming from a library system that allowed us to have – wait for it – 99 BOOKS OUT PER CARD.

I. KNOW!  Library bliss, right?  (Truth be told, it did have its downside; I spent more time looking for library books than I care to admit.  There were times when Betty and I had close to 200 books out between us, which is utter craziness. Hopefully now that will be reduced … as will our former library’s circulation statistics, no doubt.)

This just means we’ll have to read faster.  And maybe make more visits, so we can return more books quickly.  Such hardship we will have to live with, I suppose.

But the staff is just as friendly as the folks we left behind in Delaware (and really, in my opinion, the vast majority of library people – of which I was one, once upon a time – ROCK).  In our nearest library, we were surprised to find two gorgeous birds in the children’s room (caged, of course).  There is a lovebird in the most spectacular shade of soft blue that I’ve ever seen as well as a multi-colored parakeet.   My aspiring veterinarian, Betty, fell immediately in love.

And at the other library that we visited on Monday, we met the children’s librarian who immediately seemed to “get” Boo (who, being quite the very reluctant reader this summer, wanted absolutely nothing to do with the library whatsoever).  We learned that she is the former school librarian (budget cuts, thank you Governor of Pennsylvania) at the very school where Betty and Boo will be attending school, so she was telling us about the school and the various teachers they might get.  She was a delight and the epitome of all that a children’s librarian should be (as opposed to the children’s librarian at our most frequented branch in Delaware, who was a bit on the Cruella deVille side.)

Anyway, so between the two library visits, here’s my loot for this week:

Bird in a Box, by Andrea Davis Pinkney 
Small as an Elephant, by Jennifer Richard Jacobson
Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter, by Tom Franklin
April and Oliver, by Tess Callahan
Freedom, by Jonathan Franzen
The Years, by Virginia Woolf
Suffer the Children: The Case Against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative, by Marilyn Wedge
Do More Than Give: The Six Practices of Donors Who Change the World, by Leslie R. Crutchfield, John V. Kania, and Mark R. Kramer
In Our Time: Memoir of a Revolution, by Susan Brownmiller 


The first two are juvenile fiction books, definitely out of my usual reading preferences.  But I’ve been known to read such when they look particularly interesting and these two intrigue me.  Freedom and Suffer the Children were both ones that I had out from our previous library and had to return unread.  And In Our Time has been on my want-to-read list for an eternity, so I was thrilled to see that!

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!  (Marg has the Mr. Linky this week.)

copyright 2011, Melissa, The Betty and Boo Chronicles If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.

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Library Loot: March 16-22

I’m having a hard time getting the official Library Loot button to appear, so apologies for that. Anyway, Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

Over the weekend I had to return some books, and I also wanted to see what was there in the way of audiobooks.  I have a long (10 hour round trip) drive ahead of me this weekend (there’s a Gala that The Husband and I are attending as part of his work; this will be the first my mother has heard that I am driving this distance instead of flying – which I can’t do now because Southwest jacked up their fares significantly because of the gas prices) so I wanted to make sure I was stocked up.  Of course, you know I couldn’t just go to the audiobook section … I had to see what might be on the New Books shelf, too. 

Audiobooks: 
That Old Cape Magic, by Richard Russo (9 hours)
Ford County, Stories by John Grisham  (8.5 hours)
The Postmistress, by Sarah Blake (10 hours)
(not pictured) The Story of Edgar Sawtelle (much longer … this one is 18 CDs)

All of these (with the exception of The Postmistress) are books already on my TBR shelf (I have the print version out from the library), so I thought it would make me feel especially accomplished if I could knock one of these out on this trip.  I’m kind of leaning towards The Postmistress, though I could be persuaded to change my mind.  I really don’t want to have to pack up Edgar (that thing is a Chunkster!) and That Old Cape Magic seems like a light read.  Then again, Ford County is a collection of short stories, so that might be a good choice to break up the trip between audiobook and music.  (I don’t think I can listen to an audiobook straight through.)

Have you listened or read any of these?  

Oh, and then it was over to the New Books shelf, where I found:

By Nightfall, by Michael Cunningham (really looking forward to this one)
Mr. Rosenblum Dreams in English, by Natasha Solomons

Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homelessness to Harvard, by Liz Murray (I read a little of this in the library and OMG … it looks fascinating)

Take One Candle, Light a Room, by Susan Straight

Then yesterday, I was at a meeting at one of our offices and afterward I had to return some books.  I stopped in at the nearby library branch – which is one of my very favorite branches in our system and out of the way for me normally, so it is a treat to go there and find beauties like these:

Audiobooks:
$20 Per Gallon: How the Inevitable Rise in the Price of Gasoline Will Change Our Lives for the Better, by Christopher Steiner  (I can’t think of a better depressing selection for a 10 hour car ride, can you?)   This one is 9.5 hours. 

Reading Jackie: Her Autobiography in Books, by William Kuhn  (12 hours, 30 minutes)

Going Away Shoes, by Jill McCorkle
Zoli, by Colum McCann
The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott, by Kelly O’Connor McNees 
The Way I See It: A Personal Look at Autism and Asperger’s, by Temple Grandin 
Click: When We Knew We Were Feminists, edited by Courtney E. Martin and J. Courtney Sullivan
The Quickening, by Michael Hoover
Thief, by Maureen Gibbon
The Wisdom of Sam: Observations on Life from an Uncommon Child, by Daniel Gottlieb 
The Imperfectionists, by Tom Rachman (I am kicking myself for not snagging this when it was $5 for the Kindle)
A Thousand Sisters: My Journey Into the Worst Place on Earth to Be a Woman, by Lisa J. Shannon
$20 Per Gallon 
Fresh from the Vegetarian Slow Cooker, by Robin Robertson

In addition to bringing the audiobooks with me on this trip (which will be a busy one with little non-car time for reading), I’m only bringing my current book (American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half Its Food and What We Can Do About It, by Jonathan Bloom – such an interesting book!) and my Kindle. 

But tell me … if you were looking at 10 hours in the car, which of these audiobooks would you want with you?

copyright 2011, Melissa, The Betty and Boo Chronicles If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.

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Library Loot: November 18-23


Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Marg and Claire that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

Before we make our weekly trek to the library tomorrow night, it would probably be a good idea for me to get my most recent Library Loot up. 
(And yes, those are indeed my previous week’s looted books in the background of this photo … and I know that technically, these books should have been in last week’s post.  The more books the merrier, right?)

What He’s Poised to Do, Stories by Ben Greenman
This is apparently a Harper Perennial book.  Sold.
Let the Great World Spin, by Colum McCann
This has been on my “want to read” list for what seems like forever, so I was thrilled to come across this while browsing the stacks.  
We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson
This one is supposedly hard to find, no?  Anyway, same as above … I am really excited about this one. 
How It Ended, Stories by Jay McInerney
A re-loot, for probably the third time now.  I absolutely love me some Jay McInerney, one of my literary crushes.   
Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime, by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin
If you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time, you know I’m a bit of a political junkie and can’t easily resist such a book.  This has been on my “want to read” list for awhile, plus I’m interested to compare it to David Plouffe’s The Audacity to Win and Anne Kornblut’s Notes from a Cracked Ceiling, both of which I liked (see my reviews here and here).
The Monsters of Templeton, by Lauren Groff
I really liked Groff’s short story collection, Delicate Edible Birds, and have been wanting to read this novel since reading that.  (Have you detected a theme with this post yet?)
Where the God of Love hangs Out, by Amy Bloom
A fairly recent re-loot.  I’m on an Amy Bloom kick right now.
When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present, by Gail Collins
This is likely going back to the library unread, unless I manage to read American Women (Gail Collins’s previous book) first.  I own that one, and this one is probably going to make it onto my holiday wish list. 
There was also a second, unexpected library visit during the week, where I scooped up these four books.  (I was rather impressed with myself with only getting four books, but then I remembered my previous loot … not to mention Mt. TBR that is taking over my night table and the floor surrounding it.)

Commuters, by Emily Gray Tedrowe
Another Harper Perennial book that I’ve heard so much about from book bloggers.

Molly Fox’s Birthday, by Deirdre Madden
I don’t know much about this, aside from it being a finalist for the Orange Prize.

I Curse the River of Time, by Per Petterson
Beth Kephart praised this one, so based on her recommendation, I thought I would give this a try.

The Last Talk with Lola Faye, by Thomas H. Cook
I’ve been picking this up during the last few library visits and decided that it is probably time to check it out.

More to come after Tuesday night!

copyright 2010, Melissa (Betty and Boo’s Mommy, The Betty and Boo Chronicles) If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.

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A Month’s Worth of Library Loot

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader and Claire from The Captive Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out of the library that week.

This is what your pile of library books looks like when you don’t do a Library Loot post for a month.

Oh.  Ahem.  I should clarify that to say what my Library Loot pile looks like after more than a month. Yours probably looks a little more … reasonable.
Yes, this represents more than four weeks’ worth of visits to our library.  Clearly, this problem of mine isn’t going away anytime in the near future. 
Here’s what I’ve been looting since September 25:
Left pile:
The Quickening Maze, by Adam Foulds (audio)
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (audio and print versions)
Innocence, by Jane Mendelsohn
Both Ways is the Only Way I Want It, Stories by Maile Meloy
The Town that Food Saved: How One Community Found Vitality in Local Food, by Ben Hewitt
The Inheritance, by Louisa May Alcott (this is a re-loot)
Love Invents Us, by Amy Bloom
Behind the Scenes at the Museum, by Kate Atkinson
The Happiness Project, Or. Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun, by Gretchen Rubin
A Visit from the Goon Squad, by Jennifer Egan (another re-loot)
Curtains: Adventures of an Undertaker-in-Training, by Tom Jokinen  
This Book is Overdue! How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All, by Marilyn Johnson
The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World, by David Kirkpatrick
What I Didn’t See and Other Stories, by Karen Joy Fowler
Too Much Happiness, Stories by Alice Munro

right pile:
The Solitude of Prime Numbers, by Paolo Giordano (audio and print)
The Wisdom of Sam: Observations on Life from an Uncommon Child, by Daniel Gottlieb
Mad Men and Philosophy: Nothing is As It Seems, edited by Rod Carveth and James B. South
The Unnamed, by Joshua Ferris
The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson
Picnic, Lightning, Poems by Billy Collins
Not My Boy! A Father, a Son, and One Family’s Journey with Autism, by Rodney Peete (another re-loot)
The White House Garden Cookbook: Healthy Ideas from the First Family for Your Family, by Clara Silverstein  
The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, by Katherine Howe
Seasonal Fruit Desserts: From Orchard, Farm, and Market, by Deborah Madison
Girls on the Edge: The Four Factors Driving the New Crisis for Girls – Sexual Identity, the Cyberbubble, Obsessions, Environmental Toxins, by Leonard Sax
The Sonderberg Case, by Elie Wiesel
The Lake Shore Limited, by Sue Miller
Later, at the Bar, Stories by Rebecca Barry  (another re-loot)
The Irresistible Henry House, by Lisa Grunwald
Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime, by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin

We usually go to the library on Tuesday evenings, but they were closed lthis Tuesday for Election Day … which, in my case, is probably a good thing indeed. 

The library staff is probably kind of grateful to have a break from us.

copyright 2010, Melissa (Betty and Boo’s Mommy, The Betty and Boo Chronicles) If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.

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Library Loot, Doubled

I skipped Library Loot last week due to the BBAW festivities, so this post features double the loot – last week’s and this week’s. 

And what a haul it was.  I want to read all of these, right now. 

First, last week’s loot. 

 

Scroogenomics: Why You Shouldn’t Buy Presents for the Holidays, by Joel Waldfogel
Truly, a book only The Grinch himself could love. But seriously, how could I not pick this up after seeing that cover? And with two kids who are talking about birthday and Christmas presents, this is a nice little book to pick up in the middle of a tantrum. “Oh, honey, I think I need to read why I shouldn’t buy any presents.”
I’ll pick up my Bad Mommy award whenever it’s finished being engraved.
The Blind Contessa’s New Machine, by Carey Wallace
I hadn’t heard of this before but oh, boy … does it ever sound intriguing!  I’m thinking this is going to be a Read-a-Thon book because it seems to be one that is meant to be read in one sitting.  Plus its small size makes it conducive to doing so.
Bad Marie, by Marcy Dermansky
It’s a Harper Perennial book and I’ve seen good reviews of this all over the blogs.

Only in New York: An Exploration of the World’s Most Fascinating, Frustrating, and Irrepressible City, by Sam Roberts
A map of the Bronx Zoo fell out of this one when I picked it up. I’m keeping it in there.  I think I saw this at McNally Jackson in New York and put it down, so I was thrilled to see it at the library.

Saving Sky, by Diane Stanley
This is a middle grade novel, something I never would have read before blogging, and a genre which I don’t often read unless I’m previewing something of Betty’s.  This one is a little too mature for her, but it intrigued me so I picked it up. It’s about a 13 year old who lives off the grid (no TV – which I could probably do without – and no Internet, which would be the death of me) in a world where terrorists strike at random and the country is at war. 

Stonewall Kitchen Breakfast: A Collection of Great Morning Meals, by Jonathan King, Jim Stott, and Kathy Gunst
There are some seriously delicious looking recipes in this cookbook.  I can’t look at this on an empty stomach.

Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy: A Feast of 175 Regional Recipes by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich

As if I thought the breakfast book was mouthwatering, then I get this.  It’s divided into the different regions of Italy, with recipes and photos galore.  Yum.

And now, this week’s loot:

A Mango-Shaped Space, by Wendy Mass
This is at least my third re-loot of this one.  Hopefully this time I will get to it before it is due back.

Juggling Fire, by Joanne Bell

I’ve picked this up at the library for at least four weeks straight now.  I think that’s a sign that I need to take it home with me, don’t you think?

Twenty Boy Summer, by Sarah Ockler
Because I’ve seen it reviewed everywhere. No other reason. (Oh, this one is being challenged, right? A possible banned book? All the more reason to read it then.)

If I Stay, by Gayle Forman

Our state has an awards program each summer where several books are nominated in children’s and young adult categories and put on a special display in the library.  They’re only allowed to be checked out for one week, with no renewals; the idea is that you read all of nominees and then vote for the best book.  If I Stay was a contender for this, and hence, was unavailable all summer.  Hence, seeing it back on the shelf made me grab it before it disappeared again.

The Quickening Maze, by Adam Founds

The “Finalist for the Man Booker Prize” label on thie cover caught my attention for this one. 

Wench, by Dolen Perkins-Valdez
Because it looks intriguing and I’ve seen it on several blogs.

The Graveyard Book, by Neil Gaiman
Because I am the only person who has never read this – nor any Neil Gaiman book, except for Crazy Hair (a children’s book) – and it will be perfect the the R.I.P. challenge.

Weeping Underwater Looks a Lot Like Laughter, by Michael J. White
No doubt about it, this one had me at the title.  I mean, really … with a title like that? How could you not pick it up?

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink
I like books like this.  Plus, given that I’m a fundraiser, I thought this would be of special interest.

The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters
Another one that I’ve seen everywhere and that sounds perfect for the R.I.P. Challenge.  (Not like I’ve actually signed up for it yet.  Guess I’d better do that before it is over.) 

On our way out of the library, another patron noticed my overflowing tote bag and commented on such. 

“How do you have time to read so many books?” she asked. 

Odd question, I thought, coming from someone in the library parking lot.  Then I realized that maybe there are people who go to the library and are able to just check out one book at a time (The Husband falls into that category.)

I paused and then said, “We make time.”

copyright 2010, Melissa (Betty and Boo’s Mommy, The Betty and Boo Chronicles) If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.

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Library Loot: Naked Baby, Quirky Check-Out, and Five Books Borrowed


Look at this!  Library Loot has a brand new badge!  Isn’t it purty?  It’s the creation of Molly from Book Fare Delights, just as Library Loot is hosted by Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader and Claire from The Captive Reader.

So before I share my loot, we had kind of an … interesting library visit on Tuesday night.  As I was browsing the biographies looking for something for The Husband, a baby toddled into our aisle.  A naked baby. 

“Now that’s something you don’t see every day,” Betty (age 8.5) said. The baby was accompanied by an adult, but it just kept following us. There was just something funny about a naked baby in the stacks at the library.

Then when we went to check out, the computer refused to let us take out any more books.  We were at 55 and our limit, per card, is 99, so we were more than within our limits.  But the library system just transitioned to a new database – we can now borrow from any library in the state, including college and some private libraries!!! – so things were kind of quirky.  (I thought it was because they reduced the limit of books one could have out – and I’m embarrassed to say I had a minor panic attack over this – but I later realized it was because Betty has too many books out on one topic, which would be her latest obsession of whales (particularly orcas) and dolphins.)  Hopefully that’s all it was.

Anywhoo … onto the loot for this week (thankfully there was still room on my card for these and others).  I have five books this week.

American Music, by Jane Mendelsohn.

This is the one I’m most excited about.  I’ve been looking for this for several weeks now, ever since I read Beth Kephart’s wonderful post about it, so I was thrilled to see this on the New Books shelf.

This luminous love story centers on Milo, a severely wounded veteran of the Iraq war confined to a rehabilitation hospital, and Honor, his physical therapist. When Honor touches Milo’s destroyed back, mysterious images from the past appear to each of them, puzzling her and shaking him to the core.

As Milo’s treatment progresses, the images begin to weave together in an intricate, mysterious tapestry of stories that winds through several generations. There are Joe and Pearl, a husband and wife in the 1930s, whose marriage is tested by Pearl’s bewitching artistic cousin, Vivian. There is the heartrending story of a woman photographer in the 1960s and the shocking theft of her life’s work. And the story of a man and woman in seventeenth-century Turkey—a eunuch and a sultan’s concubine—whose forbidden love is captured in music. The stories converge in a symphonic crescendo that reveals…

A Visit from the Goon Squad, by Jennifer Egan

I’ve seen this one mentioned (and praised) by several bloggers, so I was thrilled to see this, also on the New Books shelf.  I almost missed it, but am glad I didn’t.

Bennie Salazar, an aging punk rocker and record executive, and the beautiful Sasha, the troubled young woman he employs, never discover each other’s pasts, but the reader does, in intimate detail, along with the secret lives of a host of other people whose paths intersect with theirs in the course of nearly fifty years. A Visit from the Goon Squad is about time, about survival, about our private terrors, and what happens when we fail to rebound.

In an Instant: A Family’s Journey of Love and Healing, by Lee and Bob Woodruff

I heard Lee Woodruff speak during the Association of Fundraising Professionals conference in April and she was so dynamic.  She was so down-to-earth and spoke in such a conversational way that many of us were emotional upon hearing her story of her husband Bob’s head injuries sustained by a roadside bomb in Iraq. I almost bought this at the conference bookstore, as well as Lee’s follow up book, Perfectly Normal, but I held off doing so.  I borrowed Perfectly Normal from the library several weeks ago, so hopefully I’ll be able to get to this one before that is due back.

In January 2006, the Woodruffs seemed to have it all – a happy marriage and four beautiful children. Lee was a PR executive, and Bob had just been named co-anchor of ABC’s “World News Tonight.” Then, while Bob was embedded with the military in Iraq, an IED killed his cameraman and nearly killed him. In An Instant is the frank and compelling account of how Bob and Lee’s lives came together, were blown apart, and then were miraculously put together again.

Just an Ordinary Day, The Uncollected Stories of Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson’s story “The Lottery” is one of my favorites. I’m embarrassed to say that I haven’t read anything else of hers.  That will change, especially since I am thisclose to signing up for Carl’s Readers Imbibing Peril Challenge, for which I think this book would qualify.  I absolutely love the story of how this particular collection of stories came to be, according to this synopsis from Publisher’s Weekly.

From the hilarious first story in this treat of a collection, in which a college girl tricks the devil (horns, hoofs and all) into selling her his soul, we know we are in Jackson territory-the Jackson of the classic short story “The Lottery” and the novel The Haunting of Hill House. For Jackson devotees, as well as first-time readers, this is a feast: more than half of the 54 short stories collected here have never been published before. The circumstances that inspired the volume are appropriately bizarre. According to Jackson’s children, “a carton of cobwebbed files discovered in a Vermont barn” arrived in the mail one day without notice; along with the original manuscript of her novel, the box contained six unpublished stories. Other pieces, culled from family collections, and from archives and papers at the San Francisco Public Library and the Library of Congress, appeared in print only once, in various magazines. The stories are diverse: there are tales that pillory smug, self-satisfied, small-town ladies; chilling and murderous chronicles of marriage; witty romantic comedies; and tales that reveal an eerie juxtaposition of good and evil. The devil, who can’t seem to get an even break, makes several appearances. Each of Jackson’s ghost stories-often centered around a child, missing or dead-is beautifully anchored in and thoroughly shaped by a particular point of view. A few pieces that qualify as humorous takes on the predicaments of modern life add a relaxed, biographical element to a virtuoso collection. (Dec.) FYI: Jackson, who died in 1965 at age 48, is poised for a literary revival: the BBC is releasing a biography in the fall, and a new film version of The Haunting of Hill House is currently in production.

And finally, this last book is a re-loot, to borrow (hee!) Marg’s term. 

Rex: A Mother, Her Autistic Child, and the Music that Transformed Their Lives, by Cathleen Lewis

The inspiring story of Rex, a boy who is not only blind and autistic, but who also happens to be a musical savant.

How can an 11-year old boy hear a Mozart fantasy for the first time and play it back note-for-note perfectly-but struggle to navigate the familiar surroundings of his own home? Cathleen Lewis says her son Rex’s laugh of total abandon is the single most joyous sound anyone could hear, but his tortured aversion to touch and sound breaks her heart and makes her wonder what God could have had in mind. In this book she shares the mystery of Rex and the highs, lows, hopes, dreams, joy, sorrows, and faith she has journeyed through with him.

Hmm, 3 out of 5 books that relate to music somehow. Sounds like a good pile of reading to me!

copyright 2010, Melissa (Betty and Boo’s Mommy, The Betty and Boo Chronicles) If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.

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Library Loot Sept 1-7: Take Two!


This might come as a shocker, but this week I only borrowed two books from the library.

I know.  Two!

Perhaps I’ve learned a bit of restraint (not likely) or else everyone stocked up for the long holiday with unwelcome guest Earl, or maybe I just happen to have half the library’s collection on my night table. Regardless of the reason, I didn’t see much that grabbed my attention this week.

Which, given the stacks of books I already have checked out, is a good thing. 

Here are the two books I got:

Memoir: A History, by Ben Yagoda. I checked this out before and it was always due back or requested before I could read it.  So, hopefully this time will be it.
From The Washington Post: “From Augustine’s Confessions to Augusten Burroughs’s Running with Scissors, from Julius Caesar to Ulysses S. Grant, from Mark Twain to David Sedaris, the art of memoir has had a fascinating life, and deserves its own biography. “As Yagoda says: ‘Memoir has become the central form of the culture: not only the way stories are told, but the way arguments are put forth, products and properties marketed, ideas floated, acts justified, reputations constructed or salvaged. How did we come to this pass? The only way to answer that question is to go back a couple of thousand years and tell the story from the beginning,'” which is just what Yagoda does in this “excellent” history (The Washington Post).
It’s only fitting that my other book would be – you guessed it – a memoir.

Wishing for Snow: A Memoir, by Minrose Gwin.

I was just browsing in the short story section of the library when I stumbled across this one and snatched it up.  I just finished (and loved) The Queen of Palmyra,Iso I’m interested in reading Minrose Gwin’s first book. 

According to her website,  “[i]n this brave and beautifully composed tribute to her mother, Minrose Gwin accomplishes something rare in the craft of the memoir: not merely a record of a devastating mother-daughter relationship but a redemptive act of artistic witness as well. In telling the story of her mentally ill poet mother, Erin Taylor Clayton Pitner, Gwin looks backward and forward at a southern family, linking personal and cultural malaise while also attempting to envision the person her mother longed to be, the woman Gwin never knew.

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire (The Captive Reader) and Marg (ReadingAdventures) that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!


copyright 2010, Melissa (Betty and Boo’s Mommy, The Betty and Boo Chronicles) If you are reading this on a blog or website other than The Betty and Boo Chronicles or via a feedreader, this content has been stolen and used without permission.
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