the dystopian nonprofit (89/99)

 

I’m reading the new Jay McInerney novel in bed last night when I get to this passage.

Bright Precious Days - quote

Oh, where do I even fucking begin with this?

In Bright, Precious Days, main character Corrine Calloway is the Executive Director of a food bank.  (This would be a job she felt called to after working in a soup kitchen post-9/11 and for which she left her Wall Street stockbroker job.)

Now, then.  As someone with a 25 year career of working in nonprofit fundraising, let me assure you, dear reader, that summer sabbaticals on the beach in the Hamptons is most definitively not “one of the few perks” of the biz.  I mean, unless there’s some other bright, precious nonprofit sector out there. Maybe it exists on that newly-discovered Earth-like planet that The New York Times oddly felt compelled to deem breaking news this week, sending cell phones all over Earth abuzz.

But you’re intelligent life right here on Earth 1.0 and of course you know this is sheer ridiculousness.

I mean, what the fuck, McInerney?  In what universe does this occur?  Certainly not the one I’m working in. I can’t believe I went to work all summer. (h/t to my friend P. for that quip, via Facebook)

All the Executive Directors I know are working their asses off in the summer — in the office, not beachside, unless they happen to be WORKING while on vacation.  Not to mention the staff.

(Can you imagine the morale in that office, as their Executive Director is sunning herself on Long Island?)

I hate when authors do shit like this.  I really do.  And maybe I sound like I’m protesting too much, but I don’t care.  It perpetuates the myth that nonprofits are somehow easier environments than the corporate sector and that’s just entirely untrue.

Maybe I’m making too much of this and it’s just another example of how perfectly over the top this precious this novel is. I mean, there’s so much extravagance with this novel; a few pages earlier, there’s a bacchanalian-like restaurant scene — among many, many restaurant scenes — where the two diners order wine that costs several thousand dollars.

But I wish that McInerney had done his research or that his editor had caught this because it is inaccurate and presents a stereotypical and unfair picture of those working in the nonprofit sector.

99 Days of Summer BloggingThis is post #89 of 99 in my 99 Days of Summer Blogging project.

 

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2 thoughts on “the dystopian nonprofit (89/99)

  1. Melissa Garrett

    My husband has worked in the non-profit sector for as long as we’ve been married and I promise he’s never taken a beach-side sabbatical, or any sabbatical, from his job. As soon as I read the passage you had highlighted, I started laughing.

  2. Bookertalk

    This is clearly written by someone who to quote a dear friend “doesn’t know their arse from their elbow” and who couldn’t be bothered to do any research. Non profit staff at lavish feasts – maybe the higher echelons of the big charities might indulge at a corporate sponsors bash but it’s not the norm. I wouldn’t even give this author thr time of day with crap like that. Maybe contact her publishers?

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